Blogging From A-Z Challenge: Letter A

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Click The Badge For More Information About The Blogging From A-Z Challenge.

Click The Badge For More Information About The Blogging From A-Z Challenge.

Classic and New Picture Book Characters With Names That Start With The Letter A:

Alexander

Amelia Bedelia

Amos McGee

Angelina Ballerina

Arthur

This is clearly just a short list of all the picture book characters I could come up with that start with the letter A. If you can think of others, classic or more recent, please list them in the comments. Thanks!

Hoppy Book Birthday to LONELY LOLA LADYBUG by Mary Jo Beswick

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Hoppy Book Birthday!

Hoppy Book Birthday!

Hoppy Book Birthday to Lonely Lola Ladybug by Mary Jo Beswick!

The Lonely Lola Ladybug Baby Book

  • Full Name (Title): Lonely Lola Ladybug
  • Parent (Author): Mary Jo Beswick
  • Parent (Illustrator): Mary Jo Beswick
  • Obstetrician (Publisher): Bellastoria Press
  • Birthdate (Release Date): April 1, 2015
  • Baby Photo and Vitals (Cover and More Information): www.maryjobeswick.com
  • Physical Characteristics (Format and Summary): Traditional paperback picture book/Lola is a lonely ladybug in need of a friend but afraid to leave her safe little nook in the big green tree. One day, encouraged by a lively party of ants, Lola decides she must be brave and venture out beyond her nook. She loads her backpack, gathers her courage and into the big green tree she goes in search of a friend.

Picture Books At The Library 13

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In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Finley Frog's favorite is  marked with a *. Below are a few I've cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Finley Frog’s favorite is marked with a 8). Below are a few I’ve cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

“I’ve loved you all your life, every single day. I love you oh so much — I’ll tell you all the ways!” Come see all the ways with Elmo and his Sesame Street friends!

Night Owl loves the nighttime! He can see everything, but when he doesn’t see Mommy Owl, he starts to listen…

8) Kay Kay lives in the village of Bungoma in the country of Kenya. One day as he is passing by the Star of Hope School, the schoolchildren call out to him. They want to show off their brand-new classroom. When Kay Kay looks at the room with its white walls, he realizes it could use a little artwork.

:) Ready Rabbit tries to get ready for school, but he would rather build spaceships and ride his imaginary motorcycle instead.

My daddy said, On the day you were born, I wrapped you up warm and took you for a walk to see the world.

:) A young boy rides the bus across town with his grandmother and learns to appreciate the beauty in everyday things.

In Israel, shalom means hello. And it also means goodbye! Shalom, shalom. Everybody says shalom!

Virgil the penguin finds a polar bear and tries to claim it as his own, but the polar bear wants to splash with the terns, slide with the seals, twirl with all the penguins, and be called by his name–Owen.

Elinor is used to doing very well in school, but as Poem in Your Pocket Day approaches, bringing an opportunity to meet a real poet, her struggle to write a perfect poem causes Elinor’s confidence to falter, despite Mr. Tiffin’s guidance and reassurance.

:) From ploughing the winter fields to pulling a car out of the springtime mud, the tractor has big jobs to do all year long.

Waiting…

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Lauri Fortino:

This is a great reminder for writers from Heather at Sub It Club…

Originally posted on Sub It Club:

I’ve written about waiting before but I feel like talking about it again today. Maybe it’s because I’m waiting on things… I don’t know. I guess I can’t really say that’s the reason because honestly, as writers and illustrators working toward publication aren’t we always waiting on something? Waiting for the perfect ending for our story to come to us… waiting to hear back from critique partners… waiting to hear back on queries. Waiting, waiting, waiting! Just because you have an agent or get a book published that doesn’t mean the waiting stops either. You’re still waiting for all of the same old things you used to wait for in one form or another.

I know how it feels when you send out a submission. There are possibilities that someone could like what you have sent. They might even LOVE it. You want to know what they think. You want…

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Never Underestimate the Power of a Picture Book…

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Lauri Fortino:

Check out this great cause!

Originally posted on Michelle Eastman Books:

I am celebrating the power of picture books through an initiative called #MARCHingBookstoKidshttps://www.facebook.com/PBPiO Please join us by donating a book to a child of an incarcerated parent.

prison

The Visiting Nurse Services of Iowa, Storybook Project is collecting books for children birth-17 years of age. Each month, VNS volunteers record an incarcerated parent reading a book to his/her child. The book and the recording are mailed to the child to keep. Please include a note stating that your book is part of the Picture Book Pass it On/MARCHing Books to Kids initiative.

VNS of Iowa, Storybook Project

c/o Tabby Kuehl (MARCHing Books to KIds)

1111 9th Street

Suite 320

Des Moines, Iowa 50314

Thank you for making a difference to a family in need.

burn books

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Picture Books At The Library

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In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Finley's favorite is  marked with a *. Below are a few I've cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Finley Frog’s favorite is marked with a *. Below are a few I’ve cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

:) Dot is about to get a lesson on just how important he is–because there’s a special spot for every dot in this world!

* Relates, in rhyming verse, how fate brought two best friends together.

:) Sophie loves to dress up and play with her dolls, but she wishes she had a friend to join her. Then one day Sophie meets Goose. HONK!

Snuggleford Cuddlebun, the sleepiest sloth in all of Snoozeville, attends the annual Snoozefest, where she gets free pajamas and other gifts, listens to bands and haiku, and, mostly, sleeps.

A hungry mouse meets a Busy square Cat in an amazing, brilliant, and charming tale!

Henry Holton comes from an ice hockey-obsessed family, but despite his comfort on the ice, his aspirations lead him to pursue another sport–ice dancing.

In April, 1796, young Charlotte Stuart writes a series of letters to George Washington, whose portrait is being painted by her father, reporting on her efforts and those of her brothers to follow the rules of good behavior in the book Mr. Washington gave them.

:) Zulay is a blind girl who longs to be able to run in the race on field and track day at her school.

Once there was a bear cub who lived with a little boy. But over time, the bear cub grew…and grew…and GREW!

:) Raffi feels different from the other children at school–he doesn’t like noisy games, and sometimes he gets teased. But when Raffi discovers knitting and sewing, everything changes…

Animal characters celebrate mothers, especially ones who play fun games, have bright smiles, and kiss hurt knees.

Picture Books At The Library

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In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Below are a few I've cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Finley’s favorite is marked with a *. Below are a few I’ve cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

As soon as the sun comes up, Camille opens her eyes. She has so many things to do!

Moe is little. But he is good at many things.

:) From her soft kisses and soothing hugs to her tasty tea and warming mug, Bird sweetly expresses her love to Fox so he knows that no matter how big he gets or where he goes, she is always with him.

To celebrate Rosh Chodesh, the beginning of a new month in the Jewish calendar, a family camps out in the Negev Desert in Israel and learns about the phases of the moon.

A delightful celebration of those nudie moments between bath and bed time.

:) The queen is devoted to her cats and they know they are loved, but when they try to win the king’s affection, they drive him right out of the castle–at least for a while.

* As an act of kindness, or mitzvah, six Jewish frogs secretly prepare a delicious pot of matzo ball soup for Minnie Feinsilver’s Shabbat dinner.

Ewe and Aye are very different but both dream of flying, so when Ewe’s love of wheels and Aye’s knowledge of wings come together, they finally get off the ground.

As a child, Elva asks for a violin so that she can make beautiful music, but many years pass before her dream can come true.

:) A picture book comically following one girl through each of the four seasons

:) When Mama tells Baby that she’s made a lovely lunch for her, she doesn’t know that the animals are listening at the window. And they are much hungrier than Baby.

:) Duck and Cat discover that being yourself makes for being the best of friends.

:) Just a friendly monster out taking a walk…that is, until he sees some Bunnies!!!

It’s time for The Best Pet Monster In The World Competition, and Albert can’t wait to enter his very own monster, Sidney!

By not covering his mouth or washing his hands, Simon spreads his cold to his teacher and classmates, much to the delight of three germs named Virus, Protozoa, and Bacteria.

One day the artist Henri Matisse cut a small bird from a piece of white paper…

Our Big, Beautiful World: The Importance of Diversity in Children’s Books by Karen Kilpatrick

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Pumpkinheads - Carmin Cares

Two Books From…

Pumpkinheads - Danza's Message

…Karen Kilpatrick’s Pumpkinheads Series

Diversity in children’s books is a hot topic right now. But it’s certainly not a fad. I believe most in the children’s book industry (e.g. publishers, authors, illustrators, agents, librarians) agree that diversity in children’s books is important. Children need to see other children just like them, children they can relate to, in their books. Whether we’re referring to appearance, aspects of culture, or a disability they may have, children need to see how they fit into the world around them. Books can help them do that.

On the other hand, children need to see children who are different from them in their books, in order to foster awareness, understanding, and acceptance of other people in, as guest blogger, children’s book author, and mother of 3 multi-racial children, Karen Kilpatrick calls it, Our Big, Beautiful World.

  

Our Big, Beautiful World: The Importance of Diversity in Children’s Books 

By Karen Kilpatrick

 

“Mommy, why don’t any of the girls in my class have hair like me?” my young daughter came home from preschool asking one day.   

“Because everyone is different,” I answered.  “It’s hair that not a lot of people around here have. But there are a lot of little girls with hair just like yours.”  Then I asked, “Your hair is one way that you are different from the girls in your class, but what other ways are you the same?”  

We came up with a long list of traits that she shared with her classmates, and a shorter list of traits that she didn’t.  We talked about, in simple terms, how differences are what make people beautiful, and how boring the world would be if everyone looked exactly the same.  

From that day forward, we spent a lot of time noticing appearance.  I am mainly Italian and part German, my husband a mix of Bahamian, Native American, and African American.  My three children were born with caramel skin, curly hair, and brown eyes, quite different from my straight blond hair, blue eyes and freckles and my husband’s chocolate brown skin.  They didn’t start to notice how different we all look from each other, and how different they looked from most of their classmates, until they were about four or five years old.  And it wasn’t with concern, just curiosity, as to why they look the way they do, and why other people look they way they do.  If they had attended school in a different neighborhood, it may have been them who looked like the majority of people.  

Wherever we travel in life, I tell them, within the same city even, we will be surrounded by different groups of people.  Sometimes we will look like the majority, and sometimes, we will not. 

What has been so important to me in raising my children is that they feel comfortable around anyone.  That whether they are with brown people, peach people, caramel people, chocolate people (we have identified such a variety of skin tone shades – and there are many more!), and whether they are in the majority or minority, they know and understand that differences are to be celebrated and not feared.  

But the only way they would know not to fear difference is to experience difference.  My children can visit myriad relatives, of all different shades, who live in a wide variety of economic circumstances.  They can experience differences firsthand.  However, another way to expose children to the beauty of differences is through books, and the diverse characters found in those books.  

Children learn through storytelling.  Storytelling, through books, can introduce children to the wide, wonderful, beautiful world of differences that they may not otherwise experience.  Which is why, as an author, I am particularly careful that my books reflect a variety of characters.  It is important that children recognize and see themselves in characters but equally important that they are exposed to characters who do not look like them.  In order for this to occur, we have to have diverse characters in books, and not just in terms of skin color, but disabilities, ethnicity, culture and more.  

It’s a big, beautiful world out there, filled with a variety of people, and books are the perfect starting point in exploring and understanding that world.

Karen Kilpatrick

Author and entrepreneur Karen Kilpatrick, a mother of three multi-racial children, is a former attorney, who left her large law firm position in 2009 to start and grow two successful online legal services websites. Kilpatrick holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a Juris Doctorate from NYU School of Law. She established her own publishing firm, Nina Charles Publishing, and launched the Pumpkinheads® series in 2013. She resides in Parkland, Florida, with her husband and three children.

For more information on Karen Kilpatrick or her award-winning Pumpkinheads® series, please visit: www.pumpkinheads.com.

The Pumpkinheads® series titles include Carmin Cares (ISBN 978-1938447068), Love Monster Lulu (ISBN 978-1938447037), Sage’s Song (ISBN 978-1938447013), Danza’s Message (ISBN 978-1938447020), and Ella’s Toys (ISBN 978-1938447006).

Wally The Warm-Weather Penguin by Stephanie M. Ward

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23586783

Title: Wally The Warm-Weather Penguin

Author: Stephanie M. Ward

Illustrator: Vanessa Landin

Publisher/Year: Forwards Press/2014

Summary: Travel to the Galapagos Islands with Wally the Warm-Weather Penguin in this delightful rhyming picture book with vivid illustrations and experience the wonders of this very special place.

The weather is finally beginning to warm up here in New York, and it’s a good thing too because I was just about to pack my bags and join Wally the Emperor Penguin on the warm, tropical shores of the Galapagos Islands. Wally, who comes from the anything-but-balmy beaches of Antarctica, had the right idea. He was tired of wearing his boots, hat, and scarf (I can relate!) while playing outside, so he set sail for the Galapagos Islands. 

What he discovered when he got there was a whole new world, completely different from where he came from, with strange new creatures, and most importantly–it was warm! I think Wally will be staying for a while. Can you blame him?

Children will enjoy the clever rhyme and bright illustrations of Wally The Warm-Weather Penguin, and will most likely ask to read it again and again. Parents will appreciate the Fascinating Facts section in the back that gives more information about all of the animals mentioned in the story, including, Emperor Penguins, Blue-Footed Boobies, Sally Lightfoot Crabs, Galapagos Penguins, Galapagos Giant Tortoises, and Marine Iguanas. Overall, it’s a fun book!

Favorite line from Wally The Warm-Weather Penguin: He threw off his scarf, his boots, and his hat, and jumped straight in the ocean with a SPLISH, SPLASH, SPLAT!

Picture Books At The Library

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In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Below are a few I've cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

In my position as a technical processing assistant at the DeWitt Community Library, I catalog a lot of new picture books. Unfortunately, I cannot review them all, but I do read them all and have assigned a :) to my favorites. Below are a few I’ve cataloged recently. (Whenever possible, summaries have been taken directly from the books.)

When Shredder, a little shrew who lives alone, overcomes his worry and sets out to explore what lies beyond the forest, he finds himself in trouble and discovers a new friend.

Hank relates to a friend a dream in which he flies to the sea, past the trees, and over the clouds.

:) When Violet decides to write a book, she insists that her twin brother help because he has good ideas, but Victor would rather count his pet worms.

Red wants to be friends. But his jokes make bunny mad.

Mia’s big sister teaches her that there is more to being a ballerina than just putting on the right clothes.

When the sheep on a farm go on strike rather than having their warm coats sheared off, the other animals begin taking sides until, at last, a compromise can be reached.

:) Tiger, Gibbon, Water Buffalo, and Gecko are sitting among the ruins of ancient Angkor Wat, wondering which of them would make the best king. The appearance of a mysterious visitor leads them to discover their true selves in a race to a distant hilltop.

:) Far away, where snowflakes twinkle like stars, little Wellington the penguin dreams of growing a garden.

:) Nature-loving sisters Maple and Willow smooth over a rough patch in their friendship in their own unique way.

As the only guinea pig left in Mrs. Pinkerley’s pet shop, Titch is getting lonely and anxious. All he wants is his very own Big Person.

Amy loves her blankie, her bear, her bunny, and her bird very much. “Mine!” she proudly crows. But what will happen when baby Joe and twins Zak and Jack want to join in and play too?

A walk through the park becomes an exuberant celebration-there are so many kinds of dogs to love!

If kids ruled the world…There’d be no such thing as bedtime. You could wear anything you like. You could have all the pets you want. And every day would be your birthday! But best of all? No one would ever be too old to PLAY!!!

Can a dog with more sweetness than smarts become a hero? (The revised and re-illustrated 35th anniversary edition)

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